David Damrosch

David Damrosch

Chair, Department of Comparative Literature
Ernest Bernbaum Professor of Comparative Literature
Director, Institute for World Literature
David Damrosch


Research Fields:
 Theory and methods of comparative literature and world literary studies; Bible and ancient Near Eastern literatures; modern European and global Anglophone literatures. Current research projects include a book on the discipline of Comparative Literature, and a book on the role of global scripts in the formation of national literatures.

Education: B.A. 1975, Ph. D. 1980, Yale University

Selected Works: The Narrative Covenant: Transformations of Genre in the Growth of Biblical Literature (1987), We Scholars: Changing the Culture of the University (1995), What Is World Literature? (2003), The Buried Book: The Loss and Rediscovery of the Great Epic of Gilgamesh (2007), and How to Read World Literature (2008). He is the founding general editor of the six-volume Longman Anthology of World Literature (2004) and the editor of Teaching World Literature (2009) and co-editor of the Princeton Sourcebook book in Comparative Literature (2009). 

A past president of the American Comparative Literature Association, David Damrosch has written widely on comparative and world literature from antiquity to the present. His books include The Narrative Covenant: Transformations of Genre in the Growth of Biblical Literature (1987), We Scholars: Changing the Culture of the University (1995), What Is World Literature? (2003), The Buried Book: The Loss and Rediscovery of the Great Epic of Gilgamesh (2007), and How to Read World Literature (2008). He is the founding general editor of the six-volume Longman Anthology of World Literature (2004) and the editor of Teaching World Literature (2009) and co-editor of The Princeton Sourcebook in Comparative Literature (2009), The Routledge Companion to World Literature (2011), and Xin fangxiang: bijiao wenxue yu shijie wenxue duben [New Directions: A Reader of Comparative and World Literature], Peking U. P., 2010. He is presently completing a book entitled Comparing the Literatures: What Every Comparatist Needs to Know, and starting a book on the role of global scripts in the formation of national literatures.

Contact Information

Fall 2016 Office Hours: TBA
Office: Dana-Palmer House 201
p: 617-496-7031